Politics

Arizona Becomes First State To Sue Biden Over Vaccination Mandates

Written by: Natalia Perez

Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich recently filed a lawsuit to block President Biden’s new vaccine requirement. Brnovich argues that Biden’s vaccine mandates violate the Constitution’s Equal Protection Clause by discriminating against U.S. citizens. He indicates that U.S. citizens are not subjected to the same type of enforcement as illegal immigrants because Biden’s mandates do not require them to take the vaccine at all.

This lawsuit is the first to come out in opposition of Biden’s vaccine requirements, however, many are expected to challenge these mandates and follow Brnovich’s lead. The Attorney General recently told an Arizona federal district court that “unauthorized aliens will not be subject to any vaccination requirements even when released directly into the United States… while roughly a hundred million U.S. citizens will be subject to unprecedented vaccination requirements.” He points to the Biden administration’s deceit in handling citizen versus non-citizen COVID-19 vaccinations.

Brnovich continued to bash Biden’s policies by stating: “This reflects an unmistakable — and unconstitutional — brand of favoritism in favor of unauthorized aliens.” In short, the attorney general is asking the court to deem the mandates as unconstitutional. The mandates will require employers with at least 100 workers to either be vaccinated or tested weekly for COVID-19. Biden will enforce this mandate with a $14,000 fine per violation.

Brnovich recently posted on Twitter, summing up the Biden Administration’s efforts, as “once again flouting laws and precedents to push their radical agenda.” The mandate also gives the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) authority to enforce it, although it is unclear if OSHA has such constitutional authority to do so. The case is Arizona v. Biden, and it focuses on the differential treatment between citizens and non-citizens in regards to the vaccination mandates.

 

Photo from: AP